FAQs Induction Lighting

  1. Will Induction lighting really last 100,000 hours?
  2. Is Induction lighting more efficient than T8 Lighting?
  3. Where would be the best uses for Induction Lighting?
  4. Is the quality of light for an Induction Lighting system superior to that of a T8 or T5HO Fluorescent system?
  5. Is Induction Lighting an effective retrofit for HIDs (Metal Halides or High Pressure Sodium)?
  6. Is Induction Lighting is a superior choice to T5 and T8 in a cold storage application?
  7. Is Induction a good solution in applications where 347V is required?


1) Will Induction lighting really last 100,000 hours?

While induction lighting is rated for 100,000 hours (meaning a 50% mortality rate at that point), this system would have significant lumen depreciation by 80,000 hours. It would only be
emitting 60% of its initial light output by this time. Therefore, unless the system is overdesigned, it would probably need to be replaced at the 40,000 hour point to be even half as effective as a
standard T5HO or T8 fluorescent system.

2) Is Induction lighting more efficient than T8 Lighting?
The initial lumen output of an induction system would be between 60 and 70 lumens per watt, while the mean light output would be 73% of the initial (or 51-58 lumens per watt). In contrast, a
T8 lighting system would provide an initial lumen output of approximately 98 lumens per watt, which is 20-30% more efficient than the induction system. The mean lumen output of the T8
would be 93 lumens per watt, which is 60 to 80% more efficient than an induction lighting system. Therefore, an induction lighting system is not nearly as efficient as a T8 lighting system.

3) Where would be the best uses for Induction Lighting?
Induction lighting is a great solution where accessibility to change the lamp is an issue, such as high atriums, escalator banks, bridges, tunnels, etc. Induction might also be a consideration
where security is an issue.

4) Is the quality of light for an Induction Lighting system superior to that of a T8 or T5HO Fluorescent system?
No. T8 and T5HO are available with higher CRIs – 85 or 86 for T8/T5HO versus 80 for Induction. Additionally, T8 and T5HO are available in 5000K systems. While Icetron systems
are available in 5000K, QL systems are only available with Kelvin Temperatures up to 4000K. Higher Kelvin temperature lamps provide more apparent light.

5) Is Induction Lighting an effective retrofit for HIDs (Metal Halides or High Pressure Sodium)?
While induction lighting can supply more apparent light than a High Pressure Sodium system and more lumens per watt than a Metal Halide, it is not a cost effective way of saving energy. Either
a T5 or a T8 system would be a much more cost effective method to reduce energy consumption. A typical T5 or T8 fixture producing the equivalent lumen output of an induction lighting fixture
would cost less than half as much, while requiring fewer watts.

6) Is Induction Lighting is a superior choice to T5 and T8 in a cold storage application?
While induction lighting will strike down to -40F, it takes much longer to come up to full brightness and consumes 30% more wattage than a T8 or T5HO System to produce the same
amount of light. T8 and T5HO will strike down to -24F. Additionally considering the fact that refrigeration costs will add 40 to 50% to the operating costs for the additional wattage consumed
by the induction system, a T5 or T8 system would be 50% more effective.

7) Is Induction a good solution in applications where 347V is required?
No. The major Induction manufacturers (Philips QL and Sylvania Icetron) do not market their induction systems in a 347V configuration. In order to use these fixtures in a 347V facility, a
small transformer would need to be used – further increasing the cost and reducing reliability of the system.

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